9 Out-of-This-World Alien Invasion Books 

    They're coming...

    Sometimes, the political situation here on Earth can seem pretty bleak. But look on the bright side: Unlike the humans in these nine harrowing tales of alien invasion, at least we don't have extraterrestrial politics to contend with, too! Yet... 

    Settle in for these nine thought-compelling, terrifying tales of otherworldly visitors, and cross your fingers that when and if first contact happens, we'll be ready to welcome our alien overlords. 

    Quozl

    By Alan Foster

    Earth is in the midst of World War II, but the Quozl don't know that. An alien race comparable to Earth's rabbits, the Quozl need a new home after overpopulating their own planet. But they weren’t prepared for the bad behavior of the violent bipeds already living on the third planet from the Sun. Although the Quozl are able to live undetected at first while the humans are distracted by their war, with the alien population growing, it won't be long before the rapidly reproducing rabbits are discovered...

    Quozl

    By Alan Foster

    The Coming

    By Joe Haldeman

    The year is 2054. World War III seems inevitable, the LGBTQ+ community faces unprecedented oppression, and Earth is in the throes of disastrous climate change. When astrophysicist professor Aurora Bell hears the message ‘we’re coming’ transmitted from deep space, the already chaotic remnants of society are sent into an uproar. Through the use of multiple points of view, The Coming offers a disconcertingly realistic portrait of how alien visitors might be received in a dystopian near future that's eerily reminiscent of our present. 

    RELATED: Re-Read: The Forever War, by Joe Haldeman 

    The Coming

    By Joe Haldeman

    Blue Light

    By Walter Mosley

    Set against the kaleidoscopic backdrop of San Fransisco in the 1960s, Blue Light begins when mysterious blue entities snake down from the sky and strike unsuspecting residents. Some are killed by contact with the light. Others are transformed into transcendent, powerful beings whose wisdom might be humanity's saving grace. Horace LaFontaine is there the day the blue light comes down and changes San Fransisco forever. But instead of being graced by the Blue Light, he’s inhabited by the presence of the Gray Man, who turns Horace into a puppet designed to take down the beautiful blues. 

    Blue Light

    By Walter Mosley

    Lilith's Brood

    By Octavia Butler

    In Octavia Butler's Dawn, the first book in the series originally called Xenogenesis (now Lilith's Brood), the relationship between human and alien 'invader' is incredibly nuanced. The protagonist, Lilith, awakes in the hold of a mysterious spacecraft. She's been unconscious for centuries, since a nuclear holocaust destroyed much of humanity, including her family. 

    Lilith and the other humans on the craft have been rescued by the alien race Oankali, but the help from the Oankali comes with a price. The Oankali  can help humans return to and resuscitate Earth, but they also long to breed with humans in order to create a generation of children better than their Oankali and human parents. The Oankali may be less invasive and certainly less explicitly violent than other alien species on this list, but Butler's story of identity, home, and what makes us human is gripping and terrifying nonetheless. 

    RELATED: 10 Octavia Butler Quotes to Live By 

    Lilith's Brood

    By Octavia Butler

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    The Alien Years

    By Robert Silverberg

    Unlike the arguably symbiotic relationship between humans and the Oankali in Octavia Butler's Dawn, there is no love lost between humans and the 'overlords' in this terrifying saga. The brutal extraterrestrials of The Alien Years are tall, physically impenetrable entities bent on making humanity suffer. Their mysterious arrival on Earth brings with it a new plague and an era of unprecedented strife. But the Carmichael family refuses to allow their spirit to be bent by the cruelty of the overlords, and their refusal to capitulate launches a multi-generational legacy of resistance that may be humanity's only hope. 

    The Alien Years

    By Robert Silverberg

    The War of the Worlds

    By H. G. Wells

    H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds is seen by many as the definitive alien invasion story. Since it was first published as a novel in 1898, this account of an extraterrestrial assault on England has left an indelible mark on the sci-fi genre — and has never once been out of print. The book follows an unnamed narrator in Surrey and his younger brother in London as they attempt to survive the violent arrival of Martians, who ravage cities and countryside from the safety of their tripod killing machines.  

    The War of the Worlds

    By H. G. Wells

    The Three-Body Problem

    By Cixin Liu

    Set partially during the Cultural Revolution that took place between 1966 and 1976, The Three-Body Problem begins as an alternate history tale in which the government houses a dark secret—the hope for communication with extraterrestrial life. Unfortunately, the aliens were listening, and, on the brink of extinction themselves, they make plans to invade Earth. Surprisingly, not everyone is so against their coming, and society quickly divides into two camps: Those who welcome the visitors, and those who are ready to fight against the Trisolaran invasion.

    The Hugo Award-winning first book in the widely acclaimed Remembrance of Earth's Past trilogy, The Three-Body Problem is an epic that spans centuries and solar systems.

    RELATED: Behold, the 2017 Hugo Nominees for Best Novel! 

    The Three-Body Problem

    By Cixin Liu

    Childhood's End

    By Arthur C. Clarke

    When they first arrive, the Overlords appear to be benevolent, and announce their desire to prevent humanity from going extinct. The mysterious visitors refuse to show themselves to humans for their first fifty years on the planet, and communicate only with the Secretary General of the United Nations—intervening rarely in human politics. But they have an insidious motive that will change, if not completely destroy, the human race — and human children are the first to be impacted.

    Childhood's End

    By Arthur C. Clarke

    Lagoon

    By Nnedi Okorafor

    When aliens arrive off the coast of Lagos, they are nothing like the creatures depicted in sci-fi movies. Their ship settles under the ocean's surface, and the visitors send waves onto shore to contact humans, pulling a marine biologist, a rapper, and a soldier down to meet the newcomers. When the three humans return to the surface, they bring with them an alien ambassador in the form of a human—Ayodele. As news of the aliens spreads, Lagoon switches narratorial points of view to depict the arrival through a dizzying variety of perspectives, even showing how the local marine life feels about their new neighbors.

    Lagoon

    By Nnedi Okorafor

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    Featured still from "War of the Worlds" via Dreamworks

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